Archive for November, 2012

25
Nov
12

Late Update From Dan


Thanksgiving and Christmas is always a time of praise and thanks. And this year is no different. Reminding me this morning was a Today Show interview with a man that had received a heart transplant 20 years ago having been on the waiting list for several years. A twist of events changed his life. His daughter was in an auto accident and was brain dead. The unthinkable happened when the doctors told him his daughter’s heart was the perfect match. He is the only man alive having to make that decision to accept a daughters heart.

As for me I am as normal as can be. It has been 18 months since my transplant. Milestone came early for me. 3 days after the transplant they sent me home. 3 weeks later I was at back in my office. 104 days after my transplant the FAA gave my pilot’s license back and today I can still shoot a 200/half IFR approach. Last year I skied the Rockies several times and already bought my season’s pass for this year. And last summer Nancy and I spent the month of July on the Nancy D in the Waters of The Georgian Bay in Canada. So the residual effect of the transplant on me is nothing. Nada.

So my health couldn’t be Better. I am on a study to reduce my rejection medication to zero. it is a 2 years process reducing the Prograf and my Current daily dosage it 1.5 Mg per day. The Docs don’t even bother to measure the Prograf blood levels anymore because it isn’t perceptible. My only other medication is the obligatory daily baby aspirin. I take no medication for blood pressure or cholesterol and my blood work is just about perfect. With luck I’ll be off Prograf in less than a year. If successful, I will be one of the very few transplant patients in the world not on rejection medication. There is always a chance this isn’t going to succeed in which case I go into rejection. While this sounds terrible it’s not – my liver would enter a slow motion process where the liver numbers increase. That’s called organ rejection and the cure is a slight increase in medication. So, worst case I’ll know my own personal minimum amount of medication. At this juncture no matter what happens my medication level will be low enough not to register with my blood work. Since Prograf has a long term toxicity to the kidney this is a good thing.

So the focus has been off of me for many months and has been on others going through the transplant process. It seems every week I’m talking to someone about transplants. The vast majority of transplant patients feel an obligation to give back and offering their talents and resources to help the next guy through the process. Transplant recipients feel it is their obligation and honor to do so.

About six months after my transplant I was asked to Chair and form a board for the Transplant Center. Officially it’s called the Transplant Advisory Council for the Comprehensive Transplant Center at Northwestern Hospital. We’ve put together a great board mostly consisting of some very grateful transplant patients with varying talents. These are generally “Type A” accomplished folks that have a desire to give back and are willing to donate their talents and resources. Our goal is to raise money for various initiatives at the CTC. Northwestern is a research institution and it is these institutions that attract the best and the brightest minds in medicine. Northwestern is a premier research hospital and the evidence is the success of their initiatives.

Of course it takes money to fund these initiatives. There are three sources for funding. First are the internal sources through the University. Second are government and foundation sources such as ITN or NIH. Third are the philanthropy sources which is the focus of our board. A research project has to show promise before NIH or ITN funding kicks in. Somehow the project needs get from point A to point B and that usually means from private sources which is the philanthropy. Those donating money bet on the jockey and Northwestern Medicine is a very good bet, indeed.

So in order to attract philanthropy we first must build a community. Over 4,000 patients have had transplants at Northwestern and now we will bring that community together. Think of this as akin to your college alumni group. It is the grateful alumni who are critical to the long term viability of any institution. If the makeup of our board is any indication a transplant alumni association it will consist of people who are about as grateful as one can get.

Our communications committee has put together both a website and Facebook page. The website is at http://www.nmhtac.org. The Facebook page is at http://www.facebook.com/NMHTAC . These sites are in pre-production beta form but you should be able to get the drift. Take a look and let us know what you think. And if you want to be part of our group please let us know.

Over the next few weeks I will outline in my blog some information about the various research projects that are showing great promise. We are already growing mice livers in the lab. Pigs are next. Stem cells are showing great promise to grow organs on demand in the years ahead. And that’s just the tip of the iceberg so stay tuned!